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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
 
 
NAME OF THE DEPARTMENT : AGRICULTURE
HEAD OF THE DEPARTMENT : JOINT DIRECTOR OF AGRICULTURE
POSTAL ADDRESS : O/o.The Joint Director of Agriculture,

Behind   Pennar Bhavan,
Buddappa Nagar,
ANANTAPUR –   515001.
OFFICE PHONE NO : 08554-275596,
08554-275596 FREE
MOBILE NO : 9505518181 FREE
OFFICE FAX NO : 08554-275984,
08554-275984 FREE
Email :  jda_anantapur @ yahoo.com
 
 
Website : http://www.apagrisnet.gov.in
 
 
Introduction
 
  The district derives its name from the headquarters town Anantapur, where a huge tank, Ananthasagaram (boundless ocean) was   constructed by Cikkavadayar during Vijaya Nagar (A.D. 1344-1377)

  The district has two distinguishing features; it has the largest geographical area among all the districts of Andhra Pradesh and also   receives the lowest quantum of rainfall among all the districts of Andhra Pradesh and second lowest in India

  Beside low quantum the variability in rainfall distribution is also very high in the district. The district is also dominated by shallow red   soils which are low in organic matter and nutrient content with low moisture retention capacity. Due to continuous droughts the ground   water levels have gone down precariously and the areas under bore wells/wells have shown a declining trend. Hardly 13 % of gross   sown area is covered by irrigation support. Although a number of water shed development programmes were implemented in the   district the problem of soil erosion and poor ground water recharge remain as acute as ever.

  In the last one decade horticulture and sericulture enterprises have gained prominence, closeness to Bangalore gives climatic   advantage to sericulture and marketing advantage to horticulture, The massive investment on irrigation has improved the prospects of   drought proofing of the district to some extent. The development of highways and physical infrastructure has unleashed the forces of   development in the district. The crop loan insurance scheme has come to the rescue of farmers during the crop failure years in the   district. The National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MGNREGA) has provided employment opportunities to the agriculture labour

   Agriculture sector plays an important role in the economy of the District. The 70 % of the District population depends on Agriculture for    their livelihood.  The share of Agriculture and allied sectors   in   Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of the district ranges from 24.25%.       (Agriculture-16.88%, Livestock-6.30,Fprestry  & Logging-0.88%, Fishing-0.18%)
 
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  Location
 
  Anantapur district lies between 13’-40’ and 15’-15’ Northern latitude and 76’-50’ and 78’-30’ Eastern longitude. It is bounded by   Kurnool district on the North Bellary on the West, Kadapa on the East and Chittoor, Tumkur & Maddikere district of Karnataka on the   South respectively

  Anantapur District was formed in the year 1882 having been separated from Bellary district.  The District has been divided into 3   Revenue Divisions consisting 63 Revenue Mandals (Anantapur Division-20, Dharmavaram Division-17 and Penukonda Division-26)   with 19130 Sq. Kms. of geographical area.  It is the largest district in the state of Andhra Pradesh.
 
  Census & Land holdings
 
   As per the census 2010, the population of the district is 40.83 lakhs.  There are 7.79 lakhs households in the district.  About 8.0 lakhs    farmers and 6.71 lakhs agricultural labourers are there in the district.  In all, 30% of the total population constitutes agricultural labour    and cultivators.
 
Land Utilisation
Sl. No. Category Hectares
1 Forests 196978
2 Barren & Uncultivable Land 183451
3 Land Put To Non-Agricultural Uses 119810
4 Cultivable Waste 52819
5 Permanent Pastures And  Other Grazing Lands 8951
6 Land Under Miscellaneous Tree Crops &  9652
Groves Not Included In Net Area Sown
7 Current Fallows 143126
8 Other Fallow Lands 84254
9 Net Area Sown 1113965
10 Total Geographical Area 1913000
11 Total Cropped Area 1187766
 
  ABOUT THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
 
  Sustainable and economical crop production is the life line for a farmer, who sheds his energy not only for his livelihood but also for the   survival of the non farming community. It is therefore, the fundamental duty of the government to safeguard the interests of the farmer.   The Department of Agriculture as one arm of the government has been established to perform the following functions in the process of    harmonizing the farming community. In the process of making the mission a reality, the department is adopting following strategies.
» Re-engineering extension approach for effective extension reach
» Empowering the farmer with advanced agricultural practices
» Capacity enhancement of Departmental Staff for an efficient extension of technology.
» Ensuring timely input supply.
» Regulation of inputs and quality control.
» Soil test based fertilizer recommendation
» Promotion of self- reliance in seed production among farmers.
» Promotion of Integrated Crop Management through INM, IPM, efficient water management etc.
» Promotion of organic farming to meet the demand of World Market.
» Correcting Micronutrient Zinc deficiency
» Reclamation of Problematic soils to restore the productivity
» Natural Resource Management through watershed approach for agricultural land development and environmental stability
» Calamity Management in the event of drought, floods, hailstorms etc.
» Promoting cultivation of low risk and low cost intensive crops
» Farm Mechanization for item and cost effective farming practices.
» Promoting Farmers Organization (Rythu Mitra Groups) for technical and monitory benefits in Agriculture and allied activities.
» Facilitate the farmer to avail Agriculture Credit.
» Women Empowerment and gender balance
» Provide day-to-day information to farmer on crop production, input supply, and marketing through Internet Services.
 
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  The Infrastructure
 
  The Departments has a strong chain of human resources consisting of extension staff of field and supervisory cadre i.e. 11Regular   Assistant Directors of Agriculture, 63 Mandal Agricultural Officers 126 Agriculture Extension Officers and 2615 Adarsha Rythus. The   staff is periodically oriented with the advanced technology emerging from time to time by re-engineering through trainings, workshops,   interactions etc., in addition, there  is  Farmers Training Centre,  Soil  Testing  laboratory,  Seed Testing  laboratory,  P.T.L   laboratory, F.C.O laboratory and  Soil Conservation Training Centre.
 
  The Allied Departments
 
  The research support to the Department is endowed by the State Agriculture University (ANGRAU) Research Stations located at   Rekalagunta, Reddipalle & Kadiri and also KVKs located at Reddipalle and Kalyanadurg. The input support is solicited through various   autonomous bodies like APSSDC, APOILFED, APSAIDC, MARKFED, HACA etc., The other eco-coordinating Departments are   Horticulture, Sericulture, Fisheries, Animal Husbandry, Irrigation, Forest, Rain Shadow Area Development and Power.
 
  Financial support is rendered by NABARD and other Banks, not only to land owning farmers but also to tenant farmers.
 
 
  Agriculture Research Support
 
   In Anantapur District there are three Agricultural Research Stations Two KVK’s (Krishi Vignan Kendra) and One DAATT Centre (District    Agricultural Advisory and Transfer of Technology) to cater day to day needs of the farmers in the district.
 
-
1 Agriculture Research Stations A.R.S Rekulakunta
    - A.R.S., Reddipalle
    - A.R.S., Kadiri
2 Krishna Vignan Kendra - K.V.K. Reddipalle
    - K.V.K Kalyanadurg
3 District Agriculture Advisory and Transfer of Technology Centre - DATT Centre,  at A.M.C Anantapur
 
» ARS, Anantapur : It is the lead center for dry land farming carrying out multi disciplinary research work on all aspects of dry land farming and meeting the needs of the dry land farmers in the red soil areas of Rayalaseema region.
» ARS, Reddipalli : It is the lead center for operational research project implementation of proven technology I the district
» ARS Kadiri: This institute was established in 1993 as a lead centre for groundnut in Andhra Pradesh to cater the needs of Groundnut farmers of the entire state. Seven high yielding groundnut varieties namely K-1, K-2, K-3, K-134 (Vemana), K-4, K-5, K-6 K-9 were released from this research station. The pre release varieties in pipe line are K-1271, and Bold seeded HPS varieties K-1340 and K-1341 are also being released from this research station.
» KVK Reddipalli: As per the mandate of ICAR 3 villages namely Chamaluru in Narpala Kadiripalli in Guntakasl, Hanimireddipalli in Kalyandurg, Apparacheruvu in Dharmavaram, Borampalli and Pathacheruvu are being adopted by the Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Reddipalli and various programmes in the disciplines of Agriculture, Horticulture, Agriculture Engineering, Agriculture Extension, Home Science and Animal Husbandry are being taken up in these adopted villages and in KVK farm at Reddipalli besides giving training to farmers and extension personnel. One more KVK is coming up at Kalyanadurg.
» KVK, Kalyanadurg: is coming up at Kalyanadurg.
» DAATT Centre :-  To give technological backup ad lend support to the extension agencies of the line departments, Acharya N.G.Ranga Agricultural University has reorganized the University extension services and established ‘District Agricultural Advisory and Transfer of Technology Centre(DAATTC) at each district headquarters of the state with a team of scientists.  One such centre at Anantapur falling under scare Rainfall zone of Andhra Pradesh started functioning since 5th December, 1998 with three scientists
» Agriculture Polytechnic: One Agriculture Polytechnic was established at Reddipalli in the year 2006 and one Agriculture Polytechnic, one Horticulture polytechnic and one Veterinary Polytechnic Colleges were established at Madakasira and also one Agriculture Engineering college is also established at Madakasira and it is the 2nd Agriculture Engineering college in the state established in Madakasira after Bapatla
» Voluntary Organizations: RDT, FES, HANDS and REDS etc., are working with the farmers in the district with an objective to up lift the socio economic status of small and marginal farmers.
 
Administrative Divisions and Planning unit
 
  The Anantapur district is divided into 11 ADA Divisions 63 Mandals and 1001 Gram Panchayats in the district
 
  Rainfall scenario
 
  The Geographical position of the Peninsula renders it, the driest part of the State and hence, Agriculture conditions are more often   precarious, Monsoons also evade this part due to its unfortunate location. Being far from the East Coast, it does not enjoy the full   benefits of North East Monsoons and being cut off by the high Western Ghats, the South West Monsoon is also prevented from   penetrating and punching the thirst of these parched soils. As a result the district is deprived of both the monsoons and often   subjected to droughts. The normal rainfall of the district is 553.0mm.by which it secures least rainfall when compared to adjoining   Rayalaseema Region and other parts of Andhra Pradesh. The normal rainfall for the South West Monsoon period is 338.0 mm which   forms about 61.2% of the total rainfall for the year. The failure of the rains in this South West monsoon period from June to September   often lead the District to drought and thereby failure of crops. The rainfall for North East monsoon period is 156.0 mm only, which forms   28.3% of annual rainfall (October to December). The remaining months of March, April and May are warm and dry and the normal daily   maximum temperature ranges between 29 C to 42 C. The November, December and January are cooler months when the   temperature falls about 17.2 C.
 
 
 
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Rainfall Pattern for the Past 11 Years in Anantapur District
Sl. No. Month Normal rainfall ACTUAL RAINFALL                   (In mm)
2001- 2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-  2009 2009-2010 2010- 2011 2011-2012
South-West Monsoon(Kharif)  
1 June 64 18.9 38.3 21.2 18.2 48.8 79.2 150.7 62.5 55.3 77.2 38.9
July 67 20.9 21.5 40.7 108.3 145.4 21.8 73.3 87.4 9 107.6 85.3
August 89 69.2 38 71.6 14.8 98 15.4 108 108.6 102.8 149.7 112.5
September 118 244.1 59.5 46.1 121.5 134.4 86 197.4 211.2 191.1 68.8 26.1
Total 338 353.1 157.3 179.6 262.8 426.6 202.4 529.4 469.7 358.2 403.3 262.8
North-East Monsoon  
2 October 111 226.2 105.1 171.6 69.8 190.9 45.2 94.6 111.9 61.5 72.2 88.9
November 35 11.7 14.3 1.4 10.7 49.5 74.2 9.4 48.6 67.1 150.8 22.6
December 10 1 1 0 0 11.9 0.9 17.4 0.5 4 0.6 3
Total 156 238.9 120.4 173 80.5 252.3 120.3 121.4 161 132.6 223.6 114.5
Winter Period  
3 January 2 6.6 0 1.3 1.5 0 0 0 0.5 4.4 0 0.6
February 1 1.6 0.1 0 5.3 0 0 21.1 0 1 0.6 0
Total 3 8.2 0.1 1.3 6.8 0 0 21.1 0.5 5.4 0.6 0.6
Hot Weather Period  
4 March 3 0.1 0.1 11.3 1.5 40.8 0 85.9 6.7 3 5.4 0
April 12 18.6 4.9 32.8 28 11.7 19.8 0.4 4.6 33.8 33.3  
May 40 83.2 7.4 125.2 53.9 59.8 65.5 57.8 71.4 83.3 57.6  
Total 55 101.9 12.4 169.3 83.4 112.3 85.3 144.1 82.7 120.1 96.3 0
Total for the Year 552 702.1 290.2 523.2 433.5 791.2 408 816 713.9 616.3 723.8 377.9
  Agro-climatic zone: Anantapur district is typical dry land tract covered under Scarce Rainfall Zone
 
  Vulnerability of the District to Natural calamities
  Anantapur is the lowest rainfall receiving district in the state with a mean rainfall of 553 mm. The rainfall intensity, frequency, pattern   and distribution is highly erratic. The dry spells and drought are very common. The district has sustained 7 years continuous drought   since 2000-01. The soils are being very shallow with low moisture holding capacity, can’t support the crops even during short dry   spells resulting in drastic reduction in yields. The farmers experience coupled with the research findings indicate Groundnut is the sole   crop which can withstand the harsh climate of Anantapur.

  Therefore Groundnut is the predominant crop grown in an area of 8.5 lakh hectares. To mitigate the effect of drought, the dry land   technology like soil moisture conservation, watershed management, drought management is being practiced in the district.
 
LAND UTILISATION
  The total geographical area of the district is 19.13 lakh Ha The land utilization pattern as available in the district is given in the tables. It   can be seen from the table that the net area sown is 9.23 Lakh Ha which forms 48.25% of the total area. The total cropped area is 9.75   Lakh Ha Area sown more than once is 0.52 Lakh Ha.

  The District occupies the lowest position in respect of Irrigation facilities with only 14.08% of the gross cropped area during 2006-2007.
  Out of the gross irrigated area of 1.37 Lakh Ha canals accounted for 17.37%, tanks 1.36%, Tube wells 70.83%, wells 10.02% and other   sources 0.42%. All the principal sources except canals are non-precarious.
 
Sl. No Category Area (In Ha) %
1 Total geographical area 1913000 100%
2 Net area sown 1113965 58.23
3 Forests 196978 10.29
4 Barren & uncultivable land 183451 9.59
5 Land put to non-agricultural uses 119810 6.27
6 Cultivable waste 52819 2.76
7 Permanent pastures and other grazing lands 8951 0.48
8 Land under miscellaneous tree crops & Groves not included in net area sown 9652 0.50
9 Current fallows 143126 7.48
10 Other fallow lands 84254 4.40
11 Total cropped area 1187766 -
12 Area sown more than once 73801 -
 
  AGRARIAN STRUCTURE
  Land Holdings
  The cultivable land in the district is mostly under occupation of small and medium farmers. The category wise number and area of   operational holdings in the district is as follows:
Sl. No Category Area (In Ha)  % of total Area    (In Ha) % of total
1 Marginal Farmers (Below 1 Ha) 227648 34.62 525622 41.88
2 Small Farmers  (1-2 Ha) 208269 31.67 302104 24.07
3 Medium Farmers  (2-10 Ha) 213905 32.53 710234 56.59
4 Large Farmers  (>10 Ha) 7800 1.19 117026 9.32
  Total 657622   1254985  
 
 
 
  Soils
  The soils in Anantapur district are predominantly Red except Kanekal, Bommanahal, Vidapanakal, Uravakonda, Vajrakarur, Guntakal,   Gooty, Pamidi, Peddavadugur, Yadiki, Tadipatri, Yellanur, Peddapappur and Putlur Mandals. In these Mandals soils are red and black   almost in equal proportion. Thus, red soils constitute 78% of the area while black soils are predominant in 20% and other soils are in   2% area of the district. The soils can be classified as sandy loams (31%), clay (24%) loamy sands (14%), sandy clay loams (13%) and   rocky lands (12%) in texture.
 
  Soil fertility status:
  Soils are poor in organic carbon content and about 88% soils analyzed in the district are low in Nitrogen, about 75% soils are medium   to high in Phosphorus content and 94% soils are medium to high in Potassium content.
 
 
 
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  Soil fertility status
  It is found that most of the soils are
» Low in organic carbon
» Medium to High in P205–
» High in K2 0
 
  Hence the soil test based fertilizer recommendation for Groundnut which is the major crop in district is   as below
Phosphorous Potash
  Available Recommended (Kg/Hac)   Available Recommended (Kg/Hac)
Low <8 40 Low <60 40
Medium 8-16 16 Medium 60-120 20
High >16 0 High >120 0
 
  In the district if the available P205 & K2 0 are high the phosphorous and potash fertilizers are not recommended and thus reducing the   cost of cultivation to the farmers
 
  IRRIGATION
  Source of major irrigation in Anantapur
S.NO SOURCE OF IRRIGATION Area in Hectares
1 CANALS 25363
2 TANKS 5403
3 TUBE WELLS & FILTER POINTS 103951
4 OTHER WELLS 14840
5 LIFT IRRIGATION 0
6 OTHER SOURCES 537
7 NET AREA IRRIGATED 119291
8 GROSS AREA IRRIGATED 151490
9 AREA IRRIGATED MORE THAN ONCE 32199
 
source-of-irrigation
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  Details of Irrigation Projects in Anantapur District
Name of the project Name of the Mandal No. of villages Ayacut (in Ha.)
Tungabhadra project,High level canal and Guntakal branch canal 1.Anantapur    3  
2.Garladinne 15  
3.B.K.Samudram 10  
4.Singanamala 9  
5.Narpala 6  
6.Vidapanakal 12  
7.Vajrakarur 1  
8.Uravakonda 3  
9.Tadipatri 9  
10.Putlur 10  
11.Yellanur 5  
12.Peddapappur 1  
13.Gooty 12  
14.Guntakal 6  
15.Pamidi 18  
16.D.Hirehal 8  
17.Peddavadugur 8  
18.Kanekal 7  
19.Bommanahal 14  
Total 157 51771
Upper pennar project 1.Kambadur 3  
2.Ramagiri 3  
3.Kanaganipalli 3  
4.Raptadu 4  
Total 13 4066
Bhairavanithippa Project 1.Gummagatta 8  
2.Brahmasamudram 6  
Total 14 4856
Chennarayaswamy Gudi Project 1.Tanakal 4  
Total 4 445
Pennar kumdvathi project 1.Hindupur 8  
2.Parigi 1  
Total 19 2639
Yogi Vemana reservoir 1.Mudigubba 13  
Total 13 5212
Pedaballi project 1.N.P.Kunta 4  
Total 4 607
  Grand Total 224 69596
 
  Farming Situations in Anantapur District
  District lies in the Scarce Rainfall Zone. By Virtue of Soil and Irrigation source the District is a divided into (9) farming situation with   majority of the District (75%) under Rainfed Red Soils and Groundnut being the major crop.

  A Given Farming Situation being unique in soil characteristics, mode of irrigation etc, the farming constraints and potentials are   uniform and unique in each situation therefore management strategies are uniform to the specific situation.
 
Rainfed Red Soils
FARMING SITUATIONS IN ANANTAPUR DISTRICT
 
Situation Name of the farming situation Area (ha)
FS 1 Canal irrigated black soils 7799
FS 2 Canal irrigated red soils 21117
FS 3 Tank irrigated black soils 3270
FS 4 Tank irrigated red soils 5997
FS 5 Well irrigated black soils 9427
FS 6 Well irrigated red soils 95240
FS 7 Rain fed black soils 114547
FS 8 Rain fed red soils 765435
FS 9 Problematic soils 39000
 
Sl. No Farming situation Area (ha) No. of Mandals Name of the mandals
1 Canal irrigated Black soils 15047 12  Gooty Putlur Guntakal Yellanur Garladinne
Kanekal P.Pappuru D.Hirehal Uravakonda Tadipatri
Bommanahal P.Vadugur      
2 Canal irrigated Red soils 11692 10 Gooty Anantapur Guntakal Singanamala B.K.Samudram
Pamid Narpala Garladinne Bommanahal Putlur
3 Tank irrigated Black soils 4056 6 Kanekal Gummagatta Guntakal Bommanahal Pamidi
Gooty
4 Tank irrigated Red soils 4332 6 Singanamala Ramagiri Gummagatta Kalyandurg Bramhasamudram
Tankallu
5 Well irrigated Black soils 18153 13 P.Pappuru Putlur Vidapanakal Yellanur Tadipatri
Gooty Bommanahal Pamidi Guntakal P.Vaduguru
Kanekal Yadiki Uravakonda    
         
6 Well irrigated Red soils 57406 58 Pamidi Chilamathur Amadagur Kanekal Amarapuram
Gooty Gorantla Gandlapenta Bommanahal Gudibanda
Singanamala Kadiri Beluguppa Penukonda Rolla
Anantapur Mudigubba Kambadur Somandepalli Agali
Rapthadu Nallamada Kundurpi Roddam Hindupur
Garladinne N.P.Kunta B.K.Samudram Puttaparthi Atmakur
Tadipatri Talupula Settur Guntakal Kuderu
Yadiki N.Cheruvu Rayadurg Kothacheruvu B.K.Samudram
Parigi O.D.C D.Hirehal Bukkapatnam Narpala
Lepakshi Tankallu Gummagatta Madakasira Putlur
P.Vaduguru Tadimarri C.K.Palli Ramagiri Yellanur
Dharmavaram Bathalapalli Kanaganapalli Kalyandurg  
7 Rainfed black soils 92333 15 Pamidi Bommanahal Tadipatri Gooty Bommanahal
Kanekal Uravakonda P.Vadugur Putlur Beluguppa
Yellanur Yadiki Guntakal Vidapanakal Singanamala
8 Rainfed red soils 628581 50 Rapthadu Tadimarri Settur Parigi Kadiri
Garladinne C.K.Palli Rayadurg Lepakshi Mudigubba
Atmakur Ramagiri Gummagatta Chilamathur Nallamada
Anantapur Kanaganapalli D.Hirehal Gorantla N.P.Kuntla
Kuderu Kalyandurg Penukonda O.D.C Talupula
B.K.Samudram Beluguppa Somandepalli Amadagur Nallacheruvu
Narpala Kambadur Roddam Madakasira Tankallu
Singanamala Beluguppa Puttaparthi Amarapuram Gandlapenta.
Vajrakarur Kambadur Kothacheruvu Gudibanda  
Dharmavaram Kundurpi Bukkapatnam Rolla  
Bathalapalli Bramhasamudram Hindupur Agali  
9 Problematic soils 190 2 P.Vaduguru Pamidi    
 
  CROP COVERAGE DURING 2011-12
  Kharif 2011
Name of the crop Kharif 2011 Normal Kharif 2011 Actual %
Groundnut 739611 713574 96.48
Rice 29989 35525 118.46
Jowar 13464 5504 40.88
Bajra 1254 2413 192.42
Maize 7559 18903 250.07
Ragi 1989 1458 73.30
Korra 436 904 207.34
Horse gram 1626 1196 73.55
Green gram 639 839 131.30
Redgram 36635 46709 127.50
Cow gram 771 905 117.38
Other pulses 64 142 221.88
Chillies 1817 3895 214.36
Turmeric 4 254 6350.00
Sugarcane 205 372 181.46
Onion 1471 3056 207.75
Sunflower 20085 5277 26.27
Castor 1755 24877 1417.49
Cotton 2584 17168 664.40
Perennialcrops 0 45467  
Vegetables 0 4735  
Other crops 61715 2975 4.82
TOTAL 904433 937444 103.65
Groundnut    
Rainfed 733445 699953  
Irrigated 6166 13621  
Total 739611 713574  
 
  Rabi 2011 – 12
Name of the crop Normal Area Actual Sown
Groundnut 19158 1364 7.12
Rice 17583 1645 9.36
Wheat 188 15 7.98
Jowar 16121 4085 25.34
Bajra 54   0.00
Maize 3396 1119 32.95
Ragi 01 34 3400.00
Bengalgram 83724 49266 58.84
Redgram 63   0.00
Green gram 51   0.00
Blackgram 120   0.00
Horsegram 1782 175 9.82
Other pulses 9 49 544.44
Sunflower 23987 2441 10.18
Safflower 72 81 112.50
Mustard 02   0.00
Linseed 03   0.00
Tobacco 194 15 7.73
Chillies 4   0.00
Cotton 17   0.00
Coriander 3577   0.00
Onion 255 18 7.06
Other Crops 4156 1474 35.47
TOTAL 174517 61852 35.44
 
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Kharif 2011 Overview
» During Kharif 2011 the district received only 271.3 mm as against normal of 338.4 mm rainfall during the south west monsoon period which is the main season for this district with meager rainfall of 25.9 mm against 118.4mm during Sept month (-78.12% deviation) which is very crucial for all the rainfed crops sown during Kharif in the district.
» Groundnut is the predominant crop grown during Kharif season under rain fed conditions, in the district. Against a normal cropped area of 7.396 lakh hectares during Kharif 2011, groundnut was sown in an extent of 7.26 lakh hectares.
» The Prolonged dry spell from 26th Aug to 14th Sept 2011 and 21st to 2nd Oct 2011 in majority of the mandals in the district subjected the June, July and August sown groundnut crop to severe moisture stress conditions at peak flowering, peg penetration, pod formation and pod development stages i.e. , the critical stages for moisture stress .
» As a result, drying up of crop and severe withering of crop with more than 50% damage occurred in many of the mandals in the district. As the groundnut crop subjected to moisture stress at critical stages of crop growth period leading to severe decline in production
» As per the crop 756 cutting experiments conducted the district average yield per Hac is only 125 Kg/Hac against the normal yield of 800 Kg/Hac
» The rainfall during North east monsoon i.e. in Oct Nov & Dec is also much below the normal and has effected both the Kharif sown crops and Rabi sowings i.e. 116 mm against the normal of 155.3mm
 
  CROP PROSPECTS 2012-13
  According to the Indian Meteorological Department's long range forecast for the 2012 south-west monsoon (June to September),   rainfall for the country is most likely to be normal (96 to 104 per cent of Long Period Average or LPA) and considering the water   availability under different sources, it was targeted to achieve 5% increase in productivity over best season during last five years is   projected of all crops.
 
Crop Calendar  For Various Crops in Anantapur District for 2012-13
S. No. Crop Kharif 2012 Rabi 2012-2013
Sowing Season(month) Harvesting (month) Sowing Season(month) Harvesting (month)
1 Paddy(Long Duration) June-July Nov-Dec Nov-Dec Mar-Apr
2 Paddy(Short Duration) June-July Oct-Nov _ _
4 Jowar(irri HYVP) July Sep-Oct Opct-Nov Jan-Feb
5 Jowar (Rainfed July Oct-Nov Sep-Oct Jan
6 Bajra June-July Oct-Nov _ _
7 Maize June-July Nov-Dec _ _
8 Ragi(Irri) June-July Oct-Nov Oct-Nov Feb-Mar
9 Redgram June-July Dec-Jan _ _
10 Bengalgram _ _ Oct-Nov Jan-Feb
11 Groundnut(Rainfed) July-Aug Oct-Nov _ _
12 Groundnut(Irri) July-Aug Oct-Nov Nov-Dec Mar-Apr
13 Sunflower(Rainfed) July-Aug Nov Oct-Nov Feb-Mar
14 Sunflower(Irri) June-July Oct-Nov Oct-Nov Feb-Mar
15 Castor July-Aug Nov-Dec _ _
16 Chilies(Irri) July-Aug Nov-Dec _ _
17 Onions June-July Oct-Nov Oct-Nov Jan-Feb
18 Coriander _ _ Oct-Nov Jan-Feb
 
SEASON-WISE TARGETTED AREA, YIELD AND PRODUCTION FOR THE YEAR 2012-13
(Area in lakh  ha; yield in kg/ha; production lakh  tonnes)
S.No Crop Area Yield Production
Kharif Rabi Total Kharif Rabi Avg. Kharif Rabi Total
1 Paddy 0.3169 0.2018 0.5187 3102.0 3054.5 3083.5 0.9830 0.6164 1.5993
2 Jowar 0.1307 0.1514 0.2821 2213.3 1101.3 1616.4 0.2892 0.1667 0.4560
3 Bajra 0.0100 0.0000 0.0100 2454.7 2026.7 2000.0 0.0245 0.0000 0.0200
4 Maize 0.0208 0.0029 0.0237 2235.2 1786.5 2181.0 0.0466 0.0051 0.0517
5 Redgram 0.48 0.00 0.4752 568 568 568 0.27 0.00 0.27
6 Bengalgram 0.00 0.81 0.8116 0 926 926 0.00 0.75 0.75
7 GreenGram 0.01 0.00 0.0087 873 365 873 0.01 0.00 0.01
8 Blackgram 0.00 0.00 0.0000 309 509 0 0.00 0.00 0.00
9 Horsegram 0.03 0.01 0.0424 578 681 605 0.02 0.01 0.03
10 Groundnut 7.82 0.20 8.0251 772 1598 793 6.04 0.32 6.36
11 Sesamum 0.00 0.00 0.0000 34 131 208 0.00 0.00 0.00
12 Sunflower 0.21 0.19 0.3968 484 879 670 0.10 0.16 0.27
13 Soyabean 0.0045 0.00 0.0045 372 0 372     0.00
14 Castor 0.0137   0.0137 874 0 874 0.0120   0.01
15 Cotton 0.04 0 0.0432 78 0 78.00 0.02   0.02
Total
Cropped area
9.19 1.63 10.82            
 
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